Candid Erotic Art in Ancient Times

erotic art

Museums are far from the boring places you might think they are. Our ancestors knew very well about the art of love and sex and liked to leave for us scenes not only from their everyday lives, battles and priests’ wisdom. Thanks to those artworks, now we know a lot about their sexual habits and preferences.

Starting as early as rock paintings in caves, humans have strived to show the beauty of the sacrament happening between a man and a woman.

 Roman erotic oil lamp </b<

Roman erotic oil lamp

 

Satyr and maenad, ancient Roman fresco from Pompeii From the Casa di Caecilius Jucundus in Pompeii, Museo Archeologico (Naples)

Satyr and maenad, ancient Roman fresco from Pompeii From the Casa di Caecilius Jucundus in Pompeii, Museo Archeologico (Naples)

 

Hyacinthus and Zephyrus, Greece

Hyacinthus and Zephyrus, Greece

 

Khajuraho sculptures, India

Khajuraho sculptures, India

 

 

Lupanar de Pompeya

Lupanar de Pompeya

 

 

Painting from Ajanta caves, India

Painting from Ajanta caves, India

 

 

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Khajuraho sculptures, India

 

 

Satyr and Hermaphrodite

Satyr and Hermaphrodite

 

 

Couple in bed. Pompeii, fresco

Couple in bed. Pompeii, fresco

 

 

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Egyptian lovers. The Metropolitan Museum Of Art, New York

 

 

Kissing. Khnumhotep and Niankhkhnum

Kissing. Khnumhotep and Niankhkhnum

 

Micon and Pero

Micon and Pero

 

First wedding night. Casa Della Farnesina, Rome, I-St century BC

First wedding night. Casa Della Farnesina, Rome, I-St century BC

 

Lady and her slave

Lady and her slave

 

Eros and Symplegma. Greece, 4th century BC

Eros and Symplegma. Greece, 4th century BC

Wife and concubine. Nishikawa-Sukenobu, Japan 1716-1735

Wife and concubine. Nishikawa-Sukenobu, Japan 1716-1735

 

Nymph and Satyr. The British Museum, 2nd century ad

Nymph and Satyr. The British Museum, 2nd century AD

 

Venus Of Willendorf. The natural history Museum, Vienna

Venus Of Willendorf. The natural history Museum, Vienna

 

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